Hands-on with WiTricity’s wireless charging for laptops

Forget the hype over universal USB-C charging. This year the new hot topic might finally be wireless charging of your laptop.  That’s what I’m thinking after seeing demos of laptops being charged using WiTricity’s wireless charging technology.

A Who’s Who of MIT Companies Presenting at CES

The promise of wireless power seems like it would involve magic. In reality, it requires magnetic fields, which is exactly what WiTricity has harnessed to let different companies power their creations – from medical devices to cars – without wires.

10 Boston-Area Cos. to Watch at the 2016 CES

WiTricity is a Watertown-based startup that develops wireless power transfer solutions for a number of applications, including consumer, automotive, medical, and military. The startup plans to demonstrate its high-power and fast wireless charging technologies, along with automotive in-vehicle charging and wireless charging for wearables, at CES this week.

Wireless Charging Visits the Hospital

Wireless charging is making its way into hospitals with the goal of eliminating power issues in everything from surgical tools to defibrillators. Medical device and component manufacturer Greatbatch has partnered with wireless charging company WiTricity to create high-performance wireless charging systems for medical devices.

Zapping Design Challenges with Wireless Charging

There are many “constants” with regard to medical device technology that create design challenges for engineers developing a product. One of these is the need to sterilize many types of non-disposable devices. Another is the need to power any type of product that uses electronics. Still another challenge involves protecting those sensitive electronics against the…

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Wireless power supplier WiTricity expands medical-industry footprint

Medical equipment makers are getting more interested in ditching the cords and wires that connect their products to electric power, and a Watertown company is seeing some benefits.  WiTricity, an MIT spinout that sells wireless electric charging systems, is announcing a new licensing deal with medical device and equipment supplierGreatbatch.

Floor pad could cut the cord for electric cars

The San Francisco Chronicle’s David R. Baker interviews WiTricity CEO Alex Gruzen about wireless charging of electric vehicles and the concept of “energy snacking.”  NOTE: This is premier content and requires a subscription to view.

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